Last edited by Garamar
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

5 edition of Viral Hepatitis B Infection in the Western Pacific Region found in the catalog.

Viral Hepatitis B Infection in the Western Pacific Region

S. K. Lam

Viral Hepatitis B Infection in the Western Pacific Region

Vaccine and Control

by S. K. Lam

  • 369 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by World Scientific Pub Co Inc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hepatology,
  • Infectious Diseases,
  • Medical Virology

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsE. K. Yeoh (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages304
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13213177M
    ISBN 109971950804
    ISBN 109789971950804
    OCLC/WorldCa12582744

      The WHO identified several hepatitis B "hot spots," with the Western Pacific region and Africa reporting most of the new cases. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C, but there great strides have been made in making treatments affordable and accessible. The disease can be cured with a 3-month course of direct-acting antivirals.   Introduction. In , World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that million people were living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (defined as hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] positive) [].The highest prevalence of HBV infected population was found in the WHO Western Pacific Region (%) and the WHO African Region (%).Author: Cristina Stasi, Caterina Silvestri, Fabio Voller.

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections remain some of the most serious global public health concerns of the last 3 decades. There were million people living with HIV (PLWH) worldwide in , and million people living with HBV infection (defined as hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] positive).   All WPR countries/areas endorsed the Regional Action Plan for Viral Hepatitis in the Western Pacific Region in (4) and the Regional Framework for the Triple Elimination of Mother-to-Child Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and Syphilis in Asia and the Pacific (triple elimination framework.

      Between and , countries in the Western Pacific Region achieved marked progress toward hepatitis B control and elimination of mother-to-child transmission through increased vaccination.   This Review presents current epidemiological trends of the most common liver diseases in Asia–Pacific countries. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains the primary cause of cirrhosis; despite declining Cited by:


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Viral Hepatitis B Infection in the Western Pacific Region by S. K. Lam Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hepatitis in the Western Pacific Region As ofthere were an estimated million people living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and 71 million living with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection worldwide.

The Western Pacific Region bears over 40% of this global burden, with an estimated million. Get this from a library.

Viral hepatitis B infection in the western Pacific region: vaccine and control, September, Hong Kong. [S K Lam; C L Lai; E K Yeoh; Hong Kong Society of Gastroenterology.;]. The region has therefore provided many insights into the epidemiology, natural history, and control of hepatitis B infection and has been home to the first national control programmes.

Hepatitis B is hyperendemic in most countries of the region, with carrier rates ranging from % except in Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, where the mean carrier rate is less than 2%.Cited by: Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem in the Western Pacific (WP) region and an important cause of morbidity and mortality among adults.

The control of hepatitis B Viral Hepatitis B Infection in the Western Pacific Region book assumed a high priority in the region, and many countries have established national programs to this by: 1. Viral hepatitis is the seventh-leading cause of mortality globally, responsible for million deaths in One quarter of the world’s population lives in the Western Pacific, but the Region bears 40% of the world’s deaths caused by hepatitis.

Hepatitis kills more than people every day in the Size: KB. Hepatitis B virus infection is a serious problem globally, and particularly in the Western Pacific Region where the population suffers disproportionately from the infection and its sequelae.

Byevery immunization programme in the Region had included hepatitis B vaccine in Cited by:   Approximately million people have chronic HBV infection, which resulted indeaths in (Fig. 1, 2 Global hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was estimated to be %, with the highest endemicity in African and Western Pacific regions (% and %, respectively).

3 HBV endemicity is categorized as low (Cited by: 3. Hepatitis in the Western Pacific. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The condition can be self-limiting or can progress to fibrosis (scarring), cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Hepatitis viruses are the most common cause of hepatitis in the world but other infections, toxic substances (e.g. alcohol, certain drugs). WHO's Western Pacific Region has the highest rates of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the world; most countries have >8% prevalence of HBV chronic infection in their adult population.

InMember States of the Region adopted a resolution to reduce chronic hepatitis B infection prevalence to less than 2% among children by as an interim milestone toward a regional Cited by: WHO Western Pacific Region has led the way in hepatitis B virus (HBV) control. It is the first of WHO’s six Regions to establish a time-bound goal to reduce childhood chronic infection rates.

The region bears 40% of the world’s deaths caused by hepatitis ( deaths every day). Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in the Asia–Pacific region, and approximately 78% of liver cancer cases are a result of chronic viral hepatitis B or C.

China alone accounts for over 50% of the global liver cancer death toll. Viral hepatitis Report by the Secretariat with chronic hepatitis B virus infection have a 15% to 25% risk of dying prematurely from hepatitis B ()6 and hepatitis A vaccine ().7 Inthe Western Pacific Region set a goal of reducing chronic hepatitis B virus infection rates to less than 2% among five-year-old children by   Historically, the WHO Western Pacific Region has had the world’s highest prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection, but countries are taking strong measures to turn this trend around.

Inover 8% of children at least 5 years of age in the Region had chronic hepatitis B infection. The Meeting on the Implementation of the Regional Action Plan for Viral Hepatitis in the Western Pacific was held to review midterm progress, focusing on a wide range of prevention measures including infection control, protection of health.

Introduction. The World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region with an estimated million chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers in bears a significant burden of HBV-related mortality and morbidity.

1 Most Member States in the region have an estimated chronic HBV infection proportion of more than 8% in their adult population. Inchronic hepatitis B virus infection in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region (WPR) was highly endemic (prevalence ≥8%).Cited by: 4.

Uncommon Modes of Transmission. Transfusion-related hepatitis B is now uncommon in countries in which blood is obtained from unpaid donors screened for HBsAg and anti–hepatitis B core total antibodies (anti-HBc), with an estimated risk in the United States of 1/63, (Schreiber et al.

).Rates can be lowered even further with the introduction of nucleic acid Cited by: with chronic hepatitis B virus infection have a 15% to 25% risk of dying prematurely from hepatitis B underlying viral hepatitis is becoming a major 6 and hepatitis A vaccine ().7 Inthe Western Pacific Region set a goal of reducing chronic hepatitis B virus infection rates to less than 2% among five-year-old children by Hepatitis B infection is endemic in many communities in the Western Pacific region, with carrier rates amongst the highest in the world.

The prevalence of HBsAg positivity amongst Pacific Islanders ranges from 7% to over 30% of the adult by: Hepatitis B virus is one of the most serious and prevalent health problems, affecting more than 2 billion people worldwide.

Although highly effective vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been available sincethere are still more than million chronic carriers, 75% of whom reside in the Asia Pacific by:. Globally, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality.

Worldwide, more than 2 billion people have been exposed to HBV, and about million are chronically infected.1 The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), the serologic marker of chronicity, varies significantly : Shilpa Lingala, Marc G.

Ghany. During –, regional hepatitis B vaccine birth dose (HepB-BD) and third dose (HepB3) coverage increased from 63% to 85% and from 76% to 93%, respectively. In15 (42%) and 18 (50%) of 36 Western Pacific Region countries/areas achieved ≥95% HepB-BD and HepB3 coverage, respectively.

Chronic hepatitis infection in children declined to Cited by: 4.JANE N. ZUCKERMAN, ARIE J. ZUCKERMAN, in Sexually Transmitted Diseases, INTRODUCTION. Hepatitis B virus is responsible for the most common form of parenterally transmitted viral hepatitis, referred to originally as ‘homologous serum jaundice’ or serum hepatitis, and it is an important cause of acute and chronic liver disease.

The incubation .